Harvard-Google Project

The first books being pulled for scanning from the reference collection in September 2006.: HDS photograph/Cliff WunderlichThe first books being pulled for scanning from the reference collection in September 2006

The Harvard-Google Project is a collaboration between the Harvard University Library and Google to digitize a large number of Harvard's library books that are out of copyright and to make them available to Internet users. Andover-Harvard was the first Harvard library to complete its part in this project. Beginning in September 2006, bound volumes from the library—monographs, periodicals, reference works, and anthologies—were scanned, and most are now available for searching and reading through Internet links in HOLLIS or through Google Book Search.

Users of Harvard libraries will find a customized Harvard Google Book Search with "Find it at Harvard" links that search HOLLIS especially efficient. Both Google Book Searches include an advanced search where you can specify author and/or title if you are looking for a specific author and/or work. When you have located a specific work, click on "About this book" and search within the volume.

While only a small percentage of the collection was scanned, a number of significant works were contributed by Andover-Harvard, and these add to the religious and theological scholarly content of Google Book Search. The library's contribution includes works on biblical studies, hymnody, Christian social reform, missions, and world religions; the Congregational, Unitarian, and Universalist traditions are especially well represented.